The "Doctor" is Always In!

History of dive watches

“More people have walked on the moon than have been to the deepest place in the ocean.” In 1926, Hans Wilsdorf, the founder of Rolex, filed a patent for an ‘oyster case’ in Britain. The components of the oyster case include a screw-down crown, case back and bezel. When combined, it sealed the watch preventing water from penetrating into its insides. The original design was patented by Paul Perregaux and Georges Peret.. Read More

What is a Rolex Chameleon?

In the 1960s, Rolex offered a ladies model referred to as the “Rolex Chameleon” which had a feature that allowed the user to almost instantly change the leather strap from one color to any other color. The cases were small and conical, with a slot in the back for single-pass straps. Rolex offered many different versions of the Rolex Chameleon and continued the model up through the late 1970s. The.. Read More

What is damaskeening in a watch?

The term “damaskeening” refers to the technique of decorating the plates or bridges of the watch movement with beautiful and intricate engine-applied patterns. While the origin of the term “damaskeening” is unclear, it may be a reference to the swirling patterns found in Damascus steel. Damaskeening is a term that was unique to the American watch industry. Nowhere was the art of embellishment carried to the levels seen on American.. Read More